Review: Doctor Who: Time Lord Fairy Tales

Time Lord Fairy TalesWritten by Justin Richards
Illustrated by David Wardle

As part of an amazing Doctor Who-themed raffle basket I won recently, I acquired this amazing boxed set of “Time Lord Fairy Tales.” These sixteen short stories are told in the fashion of the fairy tales they are based on, but just like the television show they are blended with, some of these stories are definitely not for children! (Don’t let the delightful wood-cut style illustrations fool you.)  Continue reading

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Review: Born to Love Wild edited by Cara McKinnon

Born to Love Wild

Disclaimer: I received an electronic advanced reader copy of this anthology in exchange for an honest review; I consider the editor and some of the contributors friends.

Normally I keep my short story reviews, well, short, and only call out two books when I review anthologies (favorite story and story I’d like to see expanded into a novel). Since this time the editor tossed me an advanced copy of this collection, and I know Stars & Stone Books puts out quality material, I knew this volume deserved better!

This is a solid collection where even the least interesting story to me, based purely on personal opinion, was still very well written. Multiple aspects of the paranormal romance regulars are sure to appeal to all fans of the genre, and I especially appreciate the diverse cast that made up so many aspects of the romantic relationships.   Continue reading

Review: “The Steam Pump Jump” (Chronicles of St. Mary’s short) by Jodi Taylor

Steam Pump JumpThis short story very much needs the context of pretty much all of the novels in the Chronicles of St. Mary’s series so far to understand the detail of what’s going on. But otherwise, it’s a “typical” St. Mary’s lark, full of the usual shenanigans and mayhem (#disastermagnets). And as an added bonus, it’s from Markham’s point of view! Any perspective from security department versus the historians is fun, but Markham just adds that much extra flavor.

I felt that the beginning of the tale was a bit drawn out until we got to the interesting bits, but even that section had it’s laugh out loud moments of humor. This tale is not to be missed by St. Mary’s fan(atic)s.  Continue reading

Review: “CTRL Me” by Anna Zabo

CTRL MeDisclaimer: I consider the author a friend; however, I purchased this ebook short story for full price.

While I continue my trend of reading everything Anna Zabo writes, I appreciate that they’ve taught me a lot about my romance genre preferences. I enjoyed this particular short tremendously, but I think I prefer my romance in novel-length form. In this case, the beginning felt a bit rushed before it all came together as a proper love story in the end. I’d rather have enjoyed the slow burn of the two characters meeting and interacting rather than jumping into the middle of their friendship.  Continue reading

Review: “The Unexpected Infatuation” by Sara Dobie Bauer

unexpected infatuationDisclaimer: I consider the author a friend; however, I purchased this short story ebook for full price. 


I wasn’t sure about this short story at first. I’m not keen on the idea of anyone cheating in a relationship, nor do I particularly find the “gay for you” trope appealing. The writing of this story, however, is extremely elegant and evocative of the time period and the narrator himself, so I found myself swept along anyway.  Continue reading

Review: “Wild Type” by J.K. Ullrich

Wild TypeDisclaimer: I received an electronic copy of this short story as part of the full novel Syzygy from the author in exchange for an honest review.


This short story acts as a great supplemental material to the novel Syzygy. I enjoyed the insight into the character of Lily’s life in her youth, especially through effective use of flashbacks. While it doesn’t stand alone from the novel, it continues the themes and atmosphere in a way that makes me long for more stories set in this world.  Continue reading

Review: “The Battersea Barricades” (Chronicles of St. Mary’s short story) by Jodi Taylor

Battersea BarricadesFinally, some “history” of the world of St. Mary’s!

Taylor’s authorial voice makes pages and pages of expository narrative delightful rather than boring. Even more fascinating, this time she’s not talking about something “real” — this time the historical events are all from her imagination. I loved every intricate detail of it. The more specific meat of the story is told as a story to the main character, but the storytelling is just as riveting as if the main character was there, or I was viewing the events through the teller’s eyes/memories.  Continue reading