Review: “The Great St. Mary’s Day Out” (A Chronicles of St. Mary’s Short Story) by Jodi Taylor

great st mary's day outWhile I have to wonder at the logic of involving time travel in a holiday for this lot of miscreants, considering all the things that go wrong normally, I have to admit that the story wouldn’t really work, otherwise. (Though I do have faith that they’d get up to the same sort of trouble during a day trip to the next town over.)  Continue reading

Review: “The Very First Damned Thing” (A Chronicles of St. Mary’s Short Story) by Jodi Taylor

very first damned thingIt was very, very cool to not only get a glimpse of the origins St. Mary’s but also a peek into Dr. Bairstow’s head. At this point in the series, seeing his relationships with the people that he intentionally sought to staff St. Mary’s was more interesting than the jump to Waterloo (despite the delightful surprise guests we find there).  Continue reading

Review: “Roman Holiday” (Chronicles of St. Mary’s short story) by Jodi Taylor

Roman HolidayOne of the best things about these extra short stories that fit into the overall Chronicles of St. Mary’s world is that you can enjoy them without worrying about where they fit into the larger context of the story. They’re a short peek into the many, many other time travel trips that the historians have to take to keep up their funding, and are written to good effect as quick escapism. Continue reading

Review: “When A Child is Born” (Chronicles of St. Mary’s #2.5) by Jodi Taylor

when-a-child-is-bornThis short story set in the Chronicles of St. Mary’s universe is a great way for a new reader to dip their toe into the series without committing to a full novel. It highlights my favorite trio of time travelers (Max, Peterson, and Markham — with bonus Maj. Guthrie) on a relatively simple mission that obviously goes disastrously wrong.

For readers more familiar with the series, this short story does a wonderful job of showing just how picky and malleable History really is, and perhaps the rules that the historians ascribe to it aren’t really rules after all.

For those curious, the child referred to in the title is not a religious figure. In fact, he’s not the one who leaves his mark on history whatsoever, leaving me to give author Jodi Taylor major props for her subtle reminder to readers that history might be written (mostly) by men, but it survives because of women. Continue reading

Review: LIES, DAMNED LIES, AND HISTORY (Chronicles of St. Mary’s #7) by Jodi Taylor

lies-damned-lies-and-historyThis novel was another strong installment in the Chronicles of St. Mary’s time travel series, full of both laugh-out-loud and gasp-out-loud moments. I continue to love Max, Leon, Peterson, and the rest of the gang, and Taylor’s glimpses into the past are realistic and tantalizing.

I think we’ve established by this point that I adore this series, and while not every book is perfect, never once have I felt like Taylor phoned it in or didn’t raise the stakes. That being said, I’ve now finished 7 novels regarding these characters and their organization, and I have a request. Continue reading

Review: NO TIME LIKE THE PAST (Chronicles of St. Mary’s #5) by Jodi Taylor

no-time-like-the-past

After devouring five books in this series, two things are fairly obvious to me at this point:

  1. Jodi Taylor is a hell of a researcher/historian.
  2. She has also embraced a major facet of writing time travel and run with it rather than fight against it — Once again, this novel had two major climaxes. One for Max personally and one for Max in the greater scheme of the over-arching nemesis plot. And I love that these things keep happening out of order.

Continue reading