Author Interview with Nancy O’Toole Meservier

Since I was lucky enough to read an advanced reader copy (ARC) of Red and Black, I knew I had to know more behind the book! This is a fantastic debut novel — I hope you’re inclined to pick it up after reading this interview with the author. You can find my review of the book here.


Red and BlackABOUT THE BOOK

Dawn Takahashi knows a thing or two about superheroes, from the fictional ones that populate her favorite comic books, to the real-life vigilantes who keep people safe. When she’s granted an impressive set of powers of her own, she dives right in, eager to prove herself as Bailey City’s first legitimate superhero. Dressed in red and black, Dawn spends her nights jumping from rooftop to rooftop, apprehending criminals with a smile. But by day, she finds her interactions marred by crippling social awkwardness.

Alex Gage is used to life giving him the short end of the stick, from his working-class upbringing, to the recent death of his mother. He works hard to support his younger sisters, hiding his anger and frustration behind laid back charm. It’s this charm that first draws Alex and Dawn together, but their secrets may tear them apart. Because while Dawn protects the city against threats, Alex unknowingly undermines her efforts by working as a henchman for Calypso, a mysterious woman who can make anyone loyal to her with a single touch of her hand.

It’s the classic story of boy meets girl. And hero versus villain. Where only one side can win.

Amazon | Goodreads


You’ve called this book an urban fantasy with superheroes. What will appeal to fans to both genres?

I feel like I’m cheating a little bit here, because the urban fantasy and superhero genres are already so closely related. Both typically feature a modern day (usually city-like) settings and fantastical elements. Combine this with the fact that the supernatural aspects of urban fantasy worlds are often hidden, and many urban fantasy characters already have something like secret identities.

Red and Black was born out of my love for both genres. It has the taping of a superhero story, including superpowers, masks, and codenames. At the same time, it’s structured much like my favorite urban fantasy books. This includes a first-person perspective, quick pacing, and a prominent secondary romance.  Continue reading

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Author Interview with Sara Dobie Bauer

There’s nothing better than when a fabulous author is also a lovely person and friend. I’ve been hooked on Sara Dobie Bauer’s writing since I first read Bite Somebody, and her darker work is just as enticing. Today, I picked her brain about her latest release, Escaping Exile.


Escaping ExileABOUT THE BOOK

Andrew is a vampire from New Orleans, exiled to a tropical island in the 1800s as punishment for his human bloodlust. During a storm, a ship crashes off shore. After rescuing a sailor from the cannibals native to the land, Andrew becomes fascinated with his brilliant, beautiful new companion, Edmund.

Edmund is a British naturalist who has sailed the world seeking new species. Intrigued by creatures that might kill him, immortal Andrew is this scientist’s dream-but so is making his way back home. Edmund will fight to survive, even while wrapped in the arms of a monster.

As light touches and laughter turn to something much more passionate, the cannibals creep ever closer to Edmund. Can the ancient vampire keep his human alive long enough to escape exile and explore their newfound love, or will Andrew’s bloodlust seal his own doom?

Amazon | Nine Star Press | Goodreads


Writing fiction set in a historical time period always requires research. What’s the coolest thing you learned while researching for Escaping Exile, whether or not that detail made it into the text?

This is going to sound so geeky, but… the clothes. Escaping Exile takes place in the years between 1820 and 1830. It was a time when fashion for men was changing, so some men still wore breeches while others wore trousers (basically Capri pants versus pants that went all the way to the floor). Although there aren’t many clothes in the first book of The Escape Trilogy (that may or may not be a sex joke), clothes become a thing later when Edmund wears more modern attire and Andrew, as an ancient vampire, is more old school. Edmund even goes so far as to avoid cravats! It was quite scandalous for a man to show so much neck … especially when he hangs out with vampires all the time.  Continue reading

Author Interview with Rachell Nichole

The publishing industry can be a roller coaster, and often, its up to authors to make the most of it. To help Rachell Nichole ride the high of her latest release, I came up with some fun and sexy questions that highlight A Love Affair in Las Vegas.


Love Affair in Las VegasABOUT THE BOOK

Dawn Jansen has only ever wanted one thing: to provide a life for her daughter in New York City, away from the small-town minds of her family and her upbringing. She has fought hard to finally make it to manager at the Hauteman hotel, and one of her first duties is to attend a conference at the Marietta Las Vegas to learn all she can about running the show. But when she arrives in Las Vegas, her plans to learn as much as she can on a professional level, turns into learning far more about herself than her job. She may get a second-chance at this whole love thing after all.

Barnaby “Barney” Garrison has always had one goal in life: to help people. He’s found his calling as manager of the Marietta Times Square, and since his past failed relationship, has focused all of his energy on being the best manager he can be. This year, that means helping to run the Marietta Hotels second annual Hoteliers’ Conference in Vegas. But as soon as he notices Dawn in the crowd, his focus instantly splits, his desires for her swift and fierce. When he realizes the attraction is mutual, he doesn’t waste any time seducing her to his bed. But when he suspects she’s hiding something from him, he worries that maybe he’s just destined to attract two-timing women to his life.

Can what began as a fling in Vegas turn into something more once they’re home in New York? Or does what happen in Vegas truly stay in Vegas?

Buy the book!


Since romance stories depend on the appeal of their main characters, what will readers find most interesting about Dawn and Barnaby?

I think the most interesting thing for readers will be that they’re both so real. When you write romance, you are, of course, writing and selling fantasy, so there’s a certain element of fantasy, or of unattainable perfection in a lot of romance. In my books, I always strive to really make my characters real people, and Dawn and Barnaby are no different. These two have real lives, real histories, and real troubles they’re facing during the book.  Dawn is a single mom after a one-night stand in college, and Barnaby has focused his entire self on work for the past five years rather than on himself or his love life to get over his ex-fiancé.  Continue reading

Author Interview with Matthew Warner

While it wasn’t quite up my alley, Matthew Warner’s Cursed by Christ book seemed intriguing enough that I had to pick the author’s brain about it. Maybe you’ll find yourself interested in my stead.


Cursed by ChristABOUT THE BOOK

CURSED . . .

Living at her family’s rice plantation, Alice Wharton learns some disturbing news from her mother: their bloodline has been cursed. Jesus Christ punishes them for having psychic powers allegedly stolen from a Heavenly angel. He exacts penance in the form of the mother’s adulterous “communion” trysts with their reverend.

FORGOTTEN . . .

Escaping from the predatory reverend, Alice marries Major Thorne Norwick at his Georgian cotton plantation. She also meets the slave cooks, Jonah and Eliza, who show her how to telepathically eject troubling memories. When Thorne returns from fighting in the War of Northern Aggression, Alice uses this skill to hide from herself the devastating revelation that her husband now seems to serve Christ. After all, he aids a secret society—the Ku Klux Klan—that uses the symbols of her tormentor.

JUDGED.

Everywhere she looks, the specter of Christ stands in judgment. What’s more, a mysterious presence stalks her, its mind echoing with thoughts that feel all too familiar. When it reaches her, there will be hell to pay.

Amazon | Audio Book


First of all, how would you categorize the genre or genres that this book fits under?

Cursed by Christ is a Southern gothic horror novel for an adult audience.  It’s also historical since it takes place during 1860-1868.  Continue reading

Author Interview with Clark Casey

One of the best things about my job is the opportunity to read books I might otherwise never come across. Recently, I had the privilege of reading Clark Casey’s paranormal Western Dawn in Damnation. I enjoyed the book, so I furthered my goal of supporting indie authors by asking him for an interview!


Dawn in DamnationABOUT THE BOOK

WELCOME TO DAMNATION . . .
where every living soul is as dead as a doornail. Except one. 

Buddy Baker is a dead man. Literally. After gunning down more men than Billy the Kid—and being hung by a rope necktie for his crimes—the jolly, fast-drawing fugitive reckoned he’d earned himself a nonstop ticket to hell. Instead, he finds himself in Damnation: a gun-slinging ghost town located somewhere between heaven and hell.

There are no laws in Damnation. Only two simple rules: If you get shot, you go directly to hell. If you stay alive without shooting anyone for one year, you just might get into heaven.

Hardened outlaws pass the time in the saloon playing poker and wagering on who will get sent to hell next, while trying not to anger the town’s reclusive vampire or the quarrelsome werewolves. Buddy winds up in everyone’s crosshairs after swearing to protect a pretty gal who arrives in Damnation pregnant. Her child might end up a warm-blooded meal for the supernatural residents, or it could be a demon spawn on a mission to destroy them all.

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Goodreads


Westerns aren’t a genre that is considered “popular” these days. What inspired you to dive into it anyway?

As a boy from Queens, I was more likely to play cops and robbers than cowboys and Indians, but I became a big fan of the HBO series Deadwood. Then a friend introduced me to the Robert B. Parker Appaloosa books. I had been writing literary fiction, and I wanted to try my hand at something more fast-paced with a lot of dialogue and the occasional gunfight. After the popularity of True Blood and Twilight, I figured adding a vampire and some werewolves might be interesting. I set the story in the afterlife because of my preoccupation with death. Continue reading

Love at the Edge of Seventeen Authors Interview Their Characters, Part One

I’m pleased to host a stop on the blog tour for a new YA romance anthology, Love at the Edge of Seventeen, from Stars and Stone Books! It features stories by authors M.T. DeSantis, A.E. Hayes, Serena Jayne, Cara McKinnon, Mary Rogers, and Kylie Weisenborn.


Love at the Edge of SeventeenABOUT THE BOOK

It’s never easy to go through the fraught transition into adulthood, but the teens in this anthology have more to deal with than most: super powers, magic, illness, prejudice against sexual orientation and gender identity, and even death. Fortunately, they all find love at the edge of seventeen.

Kindle | iBooks | Nook | Kobo | Google Play


For our blog tour, we asked our authors to interview their characters! This is part one of three.  Continue reading

Author Interview with Nicholas Conley

I’ve had the pleasure of reviewing two projects by Nicholas Conley, so I jumped at the chance to pick his brain about his latest novel. Intraterrestrial was a wild ride, and you can find my review of it here.

IntraterrestrialABOUT THE BOOK

Adam Helios is a bully magnet without many friends. When he starts hearing a voice that claims to come from the stars, he fears he’s losing his mind, so he withdraws even further. On the way home from a meeting at the school, he and his parents are involved in a horrible car crash. With his skull cracked open, Adam’s consciousness is abducted by the alien who has been speaking to him for months.

After surviving the wreck with only minor scratches, Camille Helios must deal with her guilt over the accident that left her husband badly injured and her son in a coma. When the doctor suggests letting Adam go, Camille refuses to stop fighting for her son’s life.

Lost among galaxies, Adam must use his imagination to forge a path home before his body dies on the operating table. But even if he does return to Earth, he may end up locked inside a damaged brain forever.

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Goodreads


The premise of this book revolves around traumatic brain injury (TBI). Can you tell us about your interest in this topic?

So as with my previous novel, Pale Highway, the inspiration for this book came from my years of working in the long-term care unit of a nursing and rehabilitation home, where I cared for people with many health conditions. When I started writing Intraterrestrial, probably my biggest goal was to always make sure that the main character — Adam — is in the driver’s seat from start to finish: he’s always the central protagonist, never just a supporting character in his own story. It was extremely important, I think, to show that Adam’s TBI doesn’t make him into a plot device. Both before and after the accident, he’s a real person, with the same sorts of hopes, dreams, fears, thoughts, and feelings of anyone else.

I also wanted to explore the painful family dynamics that are caused by accidents like this one, which I saw all too often when I was working in that field. When a kid gets thrust into the medical system, their parents have to be intimately involved in every step of the process, and those parents have an insane amount of pressure (and expectations) placed on their every decision. There are no easy answers, I think, so I felt like it was important to look deeply into the pained humanity behind every person in this narrative — Adam, his parents, the medical professionals — to see each person honestly, openly, as human beings instead of caricatures.  Continue reading