Review: Escaping Exile (Escape #1) by Sara Dobie Bauer

Escaping ExileDisclaimer: I consider the author a friend; I received an electronic advanced reader copy in exchange for an honest review.

The first thing you notice about this novella is the vibrant narrative voice. You learn everything you need to know about the main character and his circumstances within the first chapter, during the inciting incident, without any hint of the dreaded “info dump.” I was fascinated by this vampire before I ever learned his name.  Continue reading

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Author Interview with Matthew Warner

While it wasn’t quite up my alley, Matthew Warner’s Cursed by Christ book seemed intriguing enough that I had to pick the author’s brain about it. Maybe you’ll find yourself interested in my stead.


Cursed by ChristABOUT THE BOOK

CURSED . . .

Living at her family’s rice plantation, Alice Wharton learns some disturbing news from her mother: their bloodline has been cursed. Jesus Christ punishes them for having psychic powers allegedly stolen from a Heavenly angel. He exacts penance in the form of the mother’s adulterous “communion” trysts with their reverend.

FORGOTTEN . . .

Escaping from the predatory reverend, Alice marries Major Thorne Norwick at his Georgian cotton plantation. She also meets the slave cooks, Jonah and Eliza, who show her how to telepathically eject troubling memories. When Thorne returns from fighting in the War of Northern Aggression, Alice uses this skill to hide from herself the devastating revelation that her husband now seems to serve Christ. After all, he aids a secret society—the Ku Klux Klan—that uses the symbols of her tormentor.

JUDGED.

Everywhere she looks, the specter of Christ stands in judgment. What’s more, a mysterious presence stalks her, its mind echoing with thoughts that feel all too familiar. When it reaches her, there will be hell to pay.

Amazon | Audio Book


First of all, how would you categorize the genre or genres that this book fits under?

Cursed by Christ is a Southern gothic horror novel for an adult audience.  It’s also historical since it takes place during 1860-1868.  Continue reading

Review: The Boogeyman’s Intern by Matt Betts

Boogeyman's InternDisclaimer: The author is a friend, and I reviewed this novel as part of the publication process. I look forward to purchasing a hardcopy version of my own.

This was a weird book set in an even weirder landscape. Betts proves that the supernatural creatures created as part of all human cultures are very similar to the humans that they support/stalk/haunt. Despite his paranormal origins, Abe is just a guy. When he’s swept up into the first murder mystery his world has ever known, that’s when things get interesting.  Continue reading

Review: City Ash and Desert Bones by Laurel Myler

City Ash and Desert BonesDisclaimer: This book was produced by the publishing company that also publishes my current series of novels; however, I purchased a hardcopy version of this novel for full price.


The mystery about Reesa, one of the narrators and main characters of this novel, hooks you from the very first line of the book. As reminders and clues slowly unwind through the rest of the tale, becoming entangled with the rest of the mystery of the world, I found myself both aching to know the truth and fearful of what I might discover.  Continue reading

Review: Canyon Shadows (Dark Tyrant #2) by C.R. Langille

Canyon ShadowsDisclaimer: I consider myself friends with the author, via the graduate writing program we both attended. However, I purchased the hardcopy version of this novel for full price.

Though this book is the second in a shared world of stories, you do not have to read the first in order to get full enjoyment from this novel (which I think is actually a prequel, anyway). Set in our contemporary world, this story features a fascinating mix of mythologies, Christian and indigenous North American, which complement each other to good effect over the course of the plot. The combination starts with a fascinating archaeological mystery and ends with an epic showdown.  Continue reading

Review: Bookburners (Season 1) created by Max Gladstone

Bookburners S1Also written by Margaret Dunlap, Mur Lafferty, and Brian Francis Slattery

I first learned about Bookburners and the modern concept of the serial novel through a blog post at Speculative Chic. I was intrigued by both the format and the story premise, so downloaded the first season on my Kindle. It languished for a while, as most things on my Kindle do, until my most recent trip out of town.

I read fairly fast, so it was actually odd to spend so much of my trip on a single book. I worried that I’d be inclined to break up the 16 episodic installments with other reading alternatives, but the story line managed to hook me and keep me going without gratuitous use of cliffhangers. The characters were the perfect mix of unique, heroic, and flawed, and I may have gasped out loud during one particular revelation.   Continue reading

Review: While the Black Stars Burn by Lucy A. Snyder

While the Black Stars BurnIn the spirit of Halloween month, I was asked by a fellow blogger to participate in her round-up of monster discussions. In looking for a way to talk about Cthulu, when I have very limited experience in the horror genre in general and H.P. Lovecraft in particular, I remembered a book that’s been sitting on my “to be read” shelf for an embarrassingly long time.

I steeled myself with bright lights and espresso and dove out of my comfort zone! You can find my in-depth look at Lucy A. Snyder’s While the Black Stars Burn at MNBernard Books!  Continue reading