Review: A Little Light Mischief (Turner Series #3.5) by Cat Sebastian

This story can be read without the others in the Turner Series, though I highly recommend them. It also shows how women have both more and less freedom to choose their paths in life during this time period. Molly and Alice are both trapped by financial circumstances, but their ability to share a room isContinue reading “Review: A Little Light Mischief (Turner Series #3.5) by Cat Sebastian”

Review: The Rat-Catcher’s Daughter (Lilywhite Boys #0.5) by K.J. Charles

One of my favorite things about K.J. Charles’ writing is how she weaves together emotion, intrigue, and suspense. Another of my favorite things is how she inserts non-straight and nonbinary characters without unnecessary fanfare into historical fiction that too often lacks such representation as it it never existed before the twentieth century. In combination, sheContinue reading “Review: The Rat-Catcher’s Daughter (Lilywhite Boys #0.5) by K.J. Charles”

Review: The Clockwork Witch by Michelle D. Sonnier

Disclaimer: I consider the author a friend; however, I purchased the hardcopy version of this book for full price. As a reader who loves period dramas where the characters are often committed to the correct manners and more, importantly, the correct clothes, I couldn’t go wrong with a version of England with TWO forms ofContinue reading “Review: The Clockwork Witch by Michelle D. Sonnier”

Review: Winter Tide (Innsmouth Legacy #1) by Ruthanna Emrys

I enjoyed and was intrigued by the original novella that set up this world, but the world created within intrigued me much more than the characters. However, I enjoyed it enough to pick up this novel to get it signed by the author at a convention, and I don’t regret any of the time spentContinue reading “Review: Winter Tide (Innsmouth Legacy #1) by Ruthanna Emrys”

Review: “Eidolon” (Whyborne & Griffin #1.5) by Jordan L. Hawk

This short story takes place near the beginning of Whyborne and Griffin’s relationship, and reading it after seven full novels is an interesting trip into the past. In this story, there’s still a bit of relationship angst that I now know to be completely unfounded, but it’s not so angsty as to make me rollContinue reading “Review: “Eidolon” (Whyborne & Griffin #1.5) by Jordan L. Hawk”

Review: “Remnant” (Caldwell & Feximal/Whyborne & Griffin Mystery) by K.J. Charles& Jordan L. Hawk

This short story is available as a free download from K.J. Charles’ website. It is best read after Stormhaven (Whyborne & Griffin #3) by Jordan L. Hawk and the full collection of The Secret Casebook of Simon Feximal by K.J. Charles because it contains significant spoilers for both.

Review: Threshold (Whyborne & Griffin #2) by Jordan L. Hawk

This book was an excellent follow-up to the first in the series, proving that Hawk is now comfortable with their world and their characters. We leave behind the Lovecraftian city of Widdershins for a company town in the Appalachian mountains, haunted by creatures who are both horrifying and unique.

Reviews: “Interlude with Tattoos,” “The Smuggler and the Warlord,” and “Feast of Stephen” (A Charm of Magpies short stories) by K.J. Charles

The following short stories are part of the Charm of Magpies series, an historical fantasy-romance world by K.J. Charles. They are best read as companions to the main trilogy.

Review: Think of England by K.J. Charles

If you’ve ever watched Downton Abbey and thought, “This show could use more espionage, blackmail, and murder,” this is the book for you! What I especially enjoyed about this book is that it is primarily a mystery/thriller with an excellent romance subplot. But more importantly, the romance subplot informs and adds to the tension of theContinue reading “Review: Think of England by K.J. Charles”

Review: Band Sinister by K.J. Charles

I have become very spoiled by how so many of Charles’ books are series that revolve around a group of people, because I desperately want more books featuring these characters. It was a bit overwhelming, being dropped in the midst of so many names and personalities, but it quickly became what made this book soContinue reading “Review: Band Sinister by K.J. Charles”