Review: The Rat-Catcher’s Daughter (Lilywhite Boys #0.5) by K.J. Charles

One of my favorite things about K.J. Charles’ writing is how she weaves together emotion, intrigue, and suspense. Another of my favorite things is how she inserts non-straight and nonbinary characters without unnecessary fanfare into historical fiction that too often lacks such representation as it it never existed before the twentieth century. In combination, sheContinue reading “Review: The Rat-Catcher’s Daughter (Lilywhite Boys #0.5) by K.J. Charles”

Review: Spectred Isle (Green Men #1) by K.J. Charles

Though it’s not stated explicitly, I think this book is best read after the author’s The Secret Casebook of Simon Feximal. Some secondary characters cross over, and it provides a good grounding on how the supernatural exists in this world. However, this book takes a deeper look at the nature of magic in this versionContinue reading “Review: Spectred Isle (Green Men #1) by K.J. Charles”

Review: Proper English (Think of England #0.5) by K.J. Charles

I will happily read pages and pages of characters in a historical novel interact at a house party. Bonus points if half of them don’t like each other, the other half like each other a bit too much, and at least one person is outright rude. I enjoyed myself so much, following the point ofContinue reading “Review: Proper English (Think of England #0.5) by K.J. Charles”

Review: Any Old Diamonds (Lilywhite Boys #1) by K.J. Charles

K.J. Charles has officially become one of “those authors,” in which I purchase the book on release day and stay up way too late finishing it on a work night. And I have zero regrets about it. This particular book references the concept of the Victorian-era melodrama multiple times. Then, it drags the reader alongContinue reading “Review: Any Old Diamonds (Lilywhite Boys #1) by K.J. Charles”

Review: “Remnant” (Caldwell & Feximal/Whyborne & Griffin Mystery) by K.J. Charles& Jordan L. Hawk

This short story is available as a free download from K.J. Charles’ website. It is best read after Stormhaven (Whyborne & Griffin #3) by Jordan L. Hawk and the full collection of The Secret Casebook of Simon Feximal by K.J. Charles because it contains significant spoilers for both.

Review: The Secret Casebook of Simon Feximal by K.J. Charles

This intertwining collection of “short stories” are a blast to read, and I love the idea of a Holmes and Watson style pairing working together in the occult realm. This is definitely a case where the author’s notes at the end enhance the coolness of what I just read, and shows how the author’s researchContinue reading “Review: The Secret Casebook of Simon Feximal by K.J. Charles”

Review: “A Queer Trade” and Rag and Bone (A Charm of Magpies World) by K.J. Charles

This connected short story and novel take place in the world of A Charm of Magpies. A reader will get the most of these stories after reading the initial trilogy and Jackdaw.

Review: Jackdaw (A Charm of Magpies World) by K.J. Charles

I thoroughly enjoy this historical fantasy world, and I’m so glad that it extends beyond the initial trilogy. Part of what I loved most about this book in particular was seeing this world through new eyes, by a person who is neither magic nor cushioned by wealth and privilege.

Reviews: “Interlude with Tattoos,” “The Smuggler and the Warlord,” and “Feast of Stephen” (A Charm of Magpies short stories) by K.J. Charles

The following short stories are part of the Charm of Magpies series, an historical fantasy-romance world by K.J. Charles. They are best read as companions to the main trilogy.

Review: Flight of Magpies (A Charm of Magpies #3) by K.J. Charles

I found this series right before the previous publishing company it was being published with folded. I was devastated, because it meant waiting months until I could finish the trilogy. Luckily, it was absolutely worth the wait. The conclusion to this trilogy brought together much of the story and plot elements from the previous books,Continue reading “Review: Flight of Magpies (A Charm of Magpies #3) by K.J. Charles”