Review: Slippery Creatures (Will Darling Adventures #1) by K.J. Charles

The bad news: This book does not end with a happily ever after. The good news: Because it’s book 1 of a trilogy! Will and Kim have fabulous and intense chemistry that only enhances the plot they’re embroiled in, and I look forward to seeing their relationship develop throughout the next two books. As always,Continue reading “Review: Slippery Creatures (Will Darling Adventures #1) by K.J. Charles”

Review: Gilded Cage (Lilywhite Boys #2) by K.J. Charles

I re-read the first Lilywhite Boys book right before starting this one, because I could and because it’s that good. This book concludes the short series admirably, though I highly recommend also making sure to read “The Ratcatcher’s Daughter” to get a better feel for the overall conflict. The first book is from a singleContinue reading “Review: Gilded Cage (Lilywhite Boys #2) by K.J. Charles”

Review: The Rat-Catcher’s Daughter (Lilywhite Boys #0.5) by K.J. Charles

One of my favorite things about K.J. Charles’ writing is how she weaves together emotion, intrigue, and suspense. Another of my favorite things is how she inserts non-straight and nonbinary characters without unnecessary fanfare into historical fiction that too often lacks such representation as it it never existed before the twentieth century. In combination, sheContinue reading “Review: The Rat-Catcher’s Daughter (Lilywhite Boys #0.5) by K.J. Charles”

Review: Spectred Isle (Green Men #1) by K.J. Charles

Though it’s not stated explicitly, I think this book is best read after the author’s The Secret Casebook of Simon Feximal. Some secondary characters cross over, and it provides a good grounding on how the supernatural exists in this world. However, this book takes a deeper look at the nature of magic in this versionContinue reading “Review: Spectred Isle (Green Men #1) by K.J. Charles”

Review: Proper English (Think of England #0.5) by K.J. Charles

I will happily read pages and pages of characters in a historical novel interact at a house party. Bonus points if half of them don’t like each other, the other half like each other a bit too much, and at least one person is outright rude. I enjoyed myself so much, following the point ofContinue reading “Review: Proper English (Think of England #0.5) by K.J. Charles”

Review: Any Old Diamonds (Lilywhite Boys #1) by K.J. Charles

K.J. Charles has officially become one of “those authors,” in which I purchase the book on release day and stay up way too late finishing it on a work night. And I have zero regrets about it. This particular book references the concept of the Victorian-era melodrama multiple times. Then, it drags the reader alongContinue reading “Review: Any Old Diamonds (Lilywhite Boys #1) by K.J. Charles”

Review: “Remnant” (Caldwell & Feximal/Whyborne & Griffin Mystery) by K.J. Charles& Jordan L. Hawk

This short story is available as a free download from K.J. Charles’ website. It is best read after Stormhaven (Whyborne & Griffin #3) by Jordan L. Hawk and the full collection of The Secret Casebook of Simon Feximal by K.J. Charles because it contains significant spoilers for both.

Review: The Secret Casebook of Simon Feximal by K.J. Charles

This intertwining collection of “short stories” are a blast to read, and I love the idea of a Holmes and Watson style pairing working together in the occult realm. This is definitely a case where the author’s notes at the end enhance the coolness of what I just read, and shows how the author’s researchContinue reading “Review: The Secret Casebook of Simon Feximal by K.J. Charles”

Review: “A Queer Trade” and Rag and Bone (A Charm of Magpies World) by K.J. Charles

This connected short story and novel take place in the world of A Charm of Magpies. A reader will get the most of these stories after reading the initial trilogy and Jackdaw.

Review: Jackdaw (A Charm of Magpies World) by K.J. Charles

I thoroughly enjoy this historical fantasy world, and I’m so glad that it extends beyond the initial trilogy. Part of what I loved most about this book in particular was seeing this world through new eyes, by a person who is neither magic nor cushioned by wealth and privilege.