Book Spotlight & Review: Red and Black by Nancy O’Toole Meservier

Next Monday is a book birthday for one of my fellow bloggers at Speculative Chic, but I couldn’t wait any longer! I was thrilled to receive an advanced electronic copy of this debut novel. This was a great, fun read that will appeal to adult and young adult readers alike, with just enough superhero antics to make you feel like you’re in the movie theater with the bonus of a longer narrative and way more interesting things than can be packed into a two-hour time span. Congratulations on the new book, Nancy — I already can’t wait for the next in the series.


Red and BlackABOUT THE BOOK

Dawn Takahashi knows a thing or two about superheroes, from the fictional ones that populate her favorite comic books, to the real-life vigilantes who keep people safe. When she’s granted an impressive set of powers of her own, she dives right in, eager to prove herself as Bailey City’s first legitimate superhero. Dressed in red and black, Dawn spends her nights jumping from rooftop to rooftop, apprehending criminals with a smile. But by day, she finds her interactions marred by crippling social awkwardness.

Alex Gage is used to life giving him the short end of the stick, from his working-class upbringing, to the recent death of his mother. He works hard to support his younger sisters, hiding his anger and frustration behind laid back charm. It’s this charm that first draws Alex and Dawn together, but their secrets may tear them apart. Because while Dawn protects the city against threats, Alex unknowingly undermines her efforts by working as a henchman for Calypso, a mysterious woman who can make anyone loyal to her with a single touch of her hand.

It’s the classic story of boy meets girl. And hero versus villain. Where only one side can win.

Amazon | Goodreads


REVIEW

Disclaimer: The author is a fellow contributor to a shared blog; I received an electronic copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

This book falls squarely in that sweet spot of being completely appropriate for both adult and young adult audiences. There’s a bit of brand-name pop culture referencing that feels a bit more YA, but there’s never a moment when I want to smack any of the characters upside the head for being idiots about relationships, which I will admit is my personal litmus test for whether a story will appeal to adults.  Continue reading

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Review: Doctor Who: Time Lord Fairy Tales

Time Lord Fairy TalesWritten by Justin Richards
Illustrated by David Wardle

As part of an amazing Doctor Who-themed raffle basket I won recently, I acquired this amazing boxed set of “Time Lord Fairy Tales.” These sixteen short stories are told in the fashion of the fairy tales they are based on, but just like the television show they are blended with, some of these stories are definitely not for children! (Don’t let the delightful wood-cut style illustrations fool you.)  Continue reading

Book Spotlight: Born to Love Wild

Born-to-Love-Wild-KindleBORN TO LOVE WILD
A Paranormal Romance Short Story Anthology from Stars and Stone Books

Featuring: USA Today Bestselling Author Traci Douglass, Cara McKinnon, Sheri Queen, Pepper McGraw, M.T. DeSantis, Read Gallo, J. Bigelow, and Andie Biagini.

Preorder Now

Kindle | iBooks | Kobo | Google Play

Traci Douglass – “Blood Strong: A Blood Ravagers Novella”
One guardian demon in love. One witch with a secret crush. One evil threatening their newfound connection.

Cara McKinnon – “A Change of Heart”
She’s a hybrid shifter who’s not supposed to exist. He’s a wolf who was born to protect her. But her secrets force him to choose: his mate, or his pack loyalty?

Sheri Queen – “The Robinson Agency”
Some are born with the gift to see into the future. Others create their own destiny.

Pepper McGraw – “Full Moon Shenanigans”
The full moon’s coming and it’s time to embrace the wildness within.

M.T. DeSantis – “Forever Love”
To find a chance… A chance to find…

Read Gallo – “The Flying Saltines”
When a river falls in love with an ordinary person will New York City survive?

J. Bigelow – “Focal Point”
Sometimes a wizard from Sweden needs help from a medium from Michigan.

Andie Biagini – “Water Temperature”
An engineering student and a cryptozoologist. One of them can talk to sea monsters, but it’s not who you think.

CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT OUR AUTHORS

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Review: Urban Dragon: Volume 1 by J.W. Troemner

Urban Dragon 1Disclaimer: I received a hardcopy of this novel through a book trade with the author.

I was sold on this book based on two things: The absolutely gorgeous cover art, and when I heard the author read from it during Cleveland ConCoction 2018. I’m a sucker for urban fantasy, but this is urban fantasy done right. It embodies many of the traditional tropes of the genre while simultaneously breaking all the rules.  Continue reading

Review: The Boogeyman’s Intern by Matt Betts

Boogeyman's InternDisclaimer: The author is a friend, and I reviewed this novel as part of the publication process. I look forward to purchasing a hardcopy version of my own.

This was a weird book set in an even weirder landscape. Betts proves that the supernatural creatures created as part of all human cultures are very similar to the humans that they support/stalk/haunt. Despite his paranormal origins, Abe is just a guy. When he’s swept up into the first murder mystery his world has ever known, that’s when things get interesting.  Continue reading

Review: Dead Indian Wars (Damnation #2) by Clark Casey

Dead Indian WarsDisclaimer: I received a free ebook from the author via Netgalley.

This fast-paced sequel to Dawn in Damnation picks up mere moments after the first book ends. Like the first installment, it’s an easy read that flows well; every chapter brings a new character, a new incident, or a new puzzle.

The narrator Tom continues to be one of my favorite characters of the town, but for much of the tale, the very omniscient storytelling jumps around between points of view, giving us only tantalizing glimpses of Tom’s character arc at times. I was pleased, however, so see that one of my complaints about the first book had been addressed, with the significant increase in named, talking characters who are neither white nor male.  Continue reading