Review: A Duke by Default (Reluctant Royals #2) by Alyssa Cole

Duke by DefaultSaying that I didn’t like this book as much as the previous in the series does a disservice to this book, because I still enjoyed it thoroughly. This is completely subjective reasoning on my part, because I did not connect with this heroine as much.  She’s a rich trust fund kid, even though she struggles with previously unaddressed behavioral and mental health issues. I wish that had been more of a plot point, rather than something mentioned and not delved into because more time needed to be spent on the relationship arc. But this is a romance novel, after all. Continue reading

Review: A Princess in Theory (Reluctant Royals #1) by Alyssa Cole

Princess in TheoryI picked up the first book in this series because a later installment features a woman in a wheelchair on the cover, and I am all about supporting representation in books. The fact that this book has two characters of color on the cover, which is a rarity for a romance novel by a major publisher not shuffled off to some “ethnic” imprint, sealed the deal for my interest in supporting this series. And I’m so glad that I did, because I ADORED this book. Continue reading

Review: Unfit to Print by K.J. Charles

Unfit to PrintJLG: October was really stressful for me, in terms of politics and worldwide events. So, comfort reading became a bit of a priority. For the next two months or so, please enjoy this ride through my adventures with the excellent writing of author K.J. Charles.


This novella was a delightful read, perfect for a quiet night at home. Charles continues to impress me with her seemingly effortless way of immersing me into England of the past, with the bonus of portraying nontraditional characters that history has otherwise tried to erase.

Vikram and Gil were a precious find, as two characters of color, both fully formed and natural features of a real London. (Many bonus points for bisexual representation, as well!) Vikram especially appealed to me with his complicated relationship between his dual identity of Englishman and India — it reminded me greatly of my own strange relationship with aspects of my heritage.  Continue reading