Review: An Unnatural Vice (Sins of the Cities #2) by K.J. Charles

Unnatural ViceMy favorite thing about this series is the overlapping mystery, in which each of the romances develop as a part of that plot. Charles’ talent for writing truly shows as each book in this trilogy feels complete even without the over-arching story yet solved.  Continue reading

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Review: An Unseen Attraction (Sins of the Cities #1) by K.J. Charles

Unseen AttractionThanks to real-life drama dragging me down, I’m back on a kick where I just want to read about happy endings. Therefore, K.J. Charles is the perfect author for me to binge-read right now. I’m so glad that a friend recommended that I check out the Sins of the Cities trilogy next, and I read the first two books in quick succession.

Slow-burn romance and chilling mystery are described in the cover blurb, and it couldn’t be more accurate. Both aspects of this novel are a joy to read, to the point where I’d have been fine it either halves were the sole focus of the novel. Together, things are made all the more intricate and interesting.  Continue reading

Review: Unfit to Print by K.J. Charles

Unfit to PrintJLG: October was really stressful for me, in terms of politics and worldwide events. So, comfort reading became a bit of a priority. For the next two months or so, please enjoy this ride through my adventures with the excellent writing of author K.J. Charles.


This novella was a delightful read, perfect for a quiet night at home. Charles continues to impress me with her seemingly effortless way of immersing me into England of the past, with the bonus of portraying nontraditional characters that history has otherwise tried to erase.

Vikram and Gil were a precious find, as two characters of color, both fully formed and natural features of a real London. (Many bonus points for bisexual representation, as well!) Vikram especially appealed to me with his complicated relationship between his dual identity of Englishman and India — it reminded me greatly of my own strange relationship with aspects of my heritage.  Continue reading

Review: Escaping Solitude (Escape #2) by Sara Dobie Bauer

Escaping SolitudeDisclaimer: I received an ebook in exchange for an honest review.

The moment I finished part one of the Escape Trilogy, Escaping Exile, I was already clamoring to the author that I needed part two right away. Of course, having completed part two, I’m begging for the conclusion immediately. While some middles of stories or trilogies drag, I enjoyed this story even more than the first one! Andrew and Edmund, and their relationship with each other, continue to delight. Continue reading

For Love the Bell Tolls: Author Interviews

Today, I’m pleased to spotlight a new anthology featuring some fabulous authors. These gothic romance short stories will have you quivering (in whichever way you choose to interpret the phrase) in your hot apple cider!


For Love the Bell TollsABOUT THE BOOK

Six haunting stories of love with a paranormal twist, including a traditional nineteenth century possessed house, lycanthropy and voodoo, zombies, a soul-stealing journal, a reaper for death, and a bargain with the fey folk. This book will tempt you to give in to your darkest desires.

Featuring Cara McKinnon, Sheri Queen, Serena Jayne, Read Gallo, Kylie Weisenborn, and Heather Sheldon.

Kindle | iBooks | Nook | Kobo | Google Play


I asked the For Love the Bell Tolls authors to tell us about the characters in their story, particularly their favorites and least favorites. I also asked them about coming up with the character’s names and the title for the story. That can be a difficult process sometimes.  Continue reading

Review: Counterpoint (Twisted Wishes #2) by Anna Zabo

CounterpointDisclaimer: I am friends with the author; however, I purchased this ebook for full price.

My favorite thing about this series is that it doesn’t follow the traditional romance script. While the story is inherently about the evolving relationship between two characters, the big climactic moment is not the two characters breaking up because one thinks that they are not good enough for the other. Instead, the threat is always external, in a way that shows the characters just how much they want (and should) to be together instead. To borrow a term from this book in particular, that seems to be catnip to me.  Continue reading